Triumph Perfekt

Perfekt2

Perferkt3

I had to wait months to relish this one: the drawband  snapped during shipping, and it lay idle as a wounded bear for months. My handyman fashioned one out of twine. The repair was complicated, and involved drilling a new hole for the twine in the drum. After two days, my friend got it going. I was ecstatic: it was the first time I typed with it.

PerfekttypefaceIt’s a gorgeous East German machine, and the touch is exceedingly responsive. The keystrokes are silky, inviting a crisp, soft touch. The rimmed glass-topped keys are alluring and spaciously arranged. The pica typeface is neat and has character. I’m sometimes put off by type that is too tidy, too upstanding. Then again, there are instances in which one wants that, such as when typing a final draft.

DylanThomasCutup

The biggest surprise was the condition of the platen and feed rollers: both are in excellent shape, and there are barely any marks on the backup sheet. That makes me suspect they were replaced, since most prewar machines have exceedingly hard platens and misshapen rollers. There’s also an overflow of rubber on the left platen ring, which may confirm my hunch.

Note: The poem above is one of a series of cut-ups on authors.

 

 

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Cut lines

Art of edifices

Fraudulent watches

While compiling my last collection, The Elastic Dome, I began a series of poems titled “The Radio Odes” using various cut-up techniques. Some of those surrealist works were included in the book. They were composed by arranging excerpts from feature shows and news reports from a popular broadcasting station. I wrote down the snippets that struck me, rearranged and tweaked them, and added a few lines of my own. Some turned out well; others didn’t pass muster.

 

The third mindI’m turning to cut-ups again, and plan a collection further on. Some are traditional, but the majority have my own spin. My source material at the moment is radio, newspapers, magazines, journal entries and excerpts from correspondence. The ones pictured were mined from a torn photocopied letter, a character sketch and a copy of Mark Twain’s On the Decay of the Art of Lying.

The Third Mind is the title of an out-of-print book by William S. Burroughs and Brion Gysin.  It features cut-ups, popularized by Burroughs and Gysin in the ’60s.

Olympia Simplex

OlympiaSimplex2

OlympiaSimplex1

This one gave me a hell of a time. The carriage kept sticking halfway, though sometimes it only stalled, piling on letters.  I oiled it, cleaned it, shook it (small pieces of rubber came out), pried it with a screwdriver and damn nearly slammed it against the wall. It frustrated me for three weeks.

And then I noticed the frame was loose. I also noticed the carriage wouldn’t advance at all when it was on a typewriter pad. However, it moved when on a flat surface. I put in washers and tightened the front bottom nuts, and now it does quite well. It still hiccups now and then, but I hope that improves with continued use. It’s a beautiful machine, and the pica typeface has lots of character.

 

The afterglow

Bookcover digitalPublishing The Elastic Dome, my new poetry collection, was anticlimactic. I got home late in the evening, exhausted: no feelings of exuberance and triumph. I drank merlot, wrote to a friend, and listened to records of Dylan Thomas reading his poetry. In hindsight, that seems fitting: writing is a solitary craft. I also knew there was a lot of work ahead marketing the book. But there was satisfaction in finally putting it behind me.

My last collection, Postcards from the Tattooed Man’s Chest, was published in 2007, andAmanuensis 10 years later I managed this one. The Elastic Dome didn’t take long to compile, though it underwent numerous revisions. I wrote 70 poems poems in six months; only 36 were chosen. It was a furious sprint, and there was an urgency to it. I think that’s partly because I began it shortly after dad died, and working on it helped me pull through, at least temporarily. But it’s not a book about grief: it’s about nothing in particular and everything of importance. I would say the underlying theme is anxiety, and that seems appropriate in an age of anxiety.

LandscapewithbridgeI’m still not in a celebratory mood: I feel relief, more than anything. It’s well documented that many artists undergo a sort of depression after completing a project. I don’t feel that yet. Instead, I moved on to other projects: another poetry collection due next year, titled Handlining Telegraphs; a play; a collaboration on rengas (linked verse); and work on my first novel, The Art of Spooks.

In the end, sales aren’t important to most poets: the demand for poetry is slim, and sales are often anemic. What has more value is getting a book in the right hands, someone who may enjoy a poem or two and remember my voice. To quote Dylan Thomas :

“When only the moon rages
And the lovers lie abed
With all their griefs in their arms,
I labor by singing light
Not for ambition or bread
Or the strut and trade of charms
On the ivory stages
But for the common wages
Of their most secret heart.”

 

 

 

Alpina DT33

AlpinaDT33a

AlpinaDT33c

A beast. The return lever is among the beefiest I’ve seen. The DT33, which has a decimal tabulator, exudes brute strength:  Norbert Schwarz, an authority on Alpinas,  points out that they are “small office machines.” Even my beloved Olympia SM3 feels like a toy compared to this DT33. The platen is rock hard, which was a bit off-putting at first, but two backup sheets improved the type.  I’ve noticed that my German portables of this time period have unusually hard platens.

An acquaintance remarked that it looks like a Buick, which, judging by his tone, wasn’t a AlpinaDT33bcompliment. I find it a beautiful machine, and think it has a distinct flair. I like its rounded features and turret-like cover. The keys are spacious, though not outsized, and it’s easy to settle into a good clip.

Will Davis (willdavis.org) notes an important feature: “One notable feature of Alpina machines is that, while they employ carriage shift, only the platen actually moves when the shift keys are depressed.  This makes shifting rather easy considering the size and weight of these machines —- these are among the very biggest and heaviest portables in the post-1958 enlarged overall size.”

It’s a portable that feels like an upright.

 

 

 

 

Cole Steel Model 2

1ColeSteel

This one took me by surprise. I almost passed on it because it seemed flimsy at first glance: I was woefully wrong about that. Although it has plastic keys, the body is metal. One may be tempted to classify it as an ultraportable, but it has more heft than a Hermes Rocket or Adler Tippa. Closer inspection revealed that it was barely used, aside from small chips in the paint. The type slugs gleam, and the pica typeface is astoundingly crisp. The backup sheet barely shows indentations.

I’ve been using a Remington Rand 17 upright, but on some days my fingers don’t jiveColeSteel2 with the smaller keys. On those days, I often turn to this Cole, which has ample keys and a nicely spaced keyboard. I like the paper gauge on the right carriage knob: one aligns the red window on it with the red arrow painted on the body. The ribbon selector eluded me at first: it’s under the knob, and I mistook it for a carriage lock, which is on the other side. Seems like an afterthought.

This one was manufactured in Western Germany. To my understanding, Cole Steel had them made there for some time. If I were going on a long trip and portability was an issue, and reliability of the essence, this one would be at the top of my list.

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